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Dianna's Sugar Plum Sundries
Soap Recipes
 

For your convenience we have provided a drop down list so you can go directly to the recipe of your choice. We also recommend you using a Soap Recipe Calculator for any changes that you might want to make to the recipe. Thank you for visiting Dianna's Sugar Plum Sundries and we hope you have a good day.


Basic Soap Recipe

This is my basic recipe for cold process soap. With this recipe you can add ingredients and adjust amounts to your hearts content. We do highly recommend using a soap recipe calculator so that your lye amounts will be correct and your recipe will be in balance. You are limited only by your imagination.

10 ounces Palm Oil
4 ounces Coconut Oil
2 ounces Olive Oil
2 ounces lye
8 fluid ounces (1 cup) distilled water
1/4 ounce essential oil (optional)

Directions:
1. Pour lye into the water (never pour water into lye) - Set aside to cool
2. Melt oils together -set aside to cool
3. When oils are approximately 110 degrees Fahrenheit and lye water is approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit, gently pour lye into oils (never pour oils into lye)
4. Mix until soap traces
5. Add essential oil (optional)
6. Pour into prepared molds
7. Cover with plastic wrap. Wrap mold in blanket to insulate.
8. Allow to stand covered and out of drafts for 48 hours
9. Remove form molds and cut as desired
10. Allow to age in open air for 2-3 weeks before using

 


 

Carrot Soap

I made this soap as an experiment and it worked so well I added it to my line. It is now one of my best sellers! The Beta Keratin makes it very good for your skin, the lather is lovely and creamy, and the orange color of the soap itself is beautiful to see! Other juices can be used for other purposes as well. I have used this same recipe for Papaya soap, apple soap and a few others. Simply replace the carrot juice with the juice of your choice!

10 ounces Palm Oil
4 ounces Coconut Oil
2 ounces Olive Oil
2.3 ounces lye
4 fluid ounces water
4 fluid ounces carrot juice

Directions:
1. Pour lye into the water (never pour water into lye) - Set aside to cool
2. Melt oils together -set aside to cool
3. When oils are approximately 110 degrees Fahrenheit and lye water is approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit, gently pour lye into oils (never pour oils into lye)
4. Add juice to mixture, stirring constantly
5. Mix until soap traces
6. Pour into prepared molds
7. Cover with plastic wrap
8. Allow to stand covered and out of drafts for 48 hours
9. Remove form molds and cut as desired
10. Allow to age in open air for 2-3 weeks before using

 


 

Egg Yolk Soap

This soap came to me from a text written in the 1880s. I have played with it a bit, and here is what I came up with. It is one of my more popular soaps. and one of my personal favorites! A bit of a warning, though, this one takes a bit more time, and is not really a good one to start with. BUT, the final soap is worth the extra attention!

10 ounces Palm Oil
4 ounces Coconut Oil
2 ounces Olive Oil
2 ounces lye
8 fluid ounces water
3-4 egg yolks to weigh 2 ounces.

Directions:
1. Pour lye into the water (never pour water into lye) - Set aside to cool
2. Melt oils together -set aside to cool
3. When oils are approximately 110 degrees Fahrenheit and lye water is approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit, gently pour lye into oils (never pour oils into lye)
4. Mix until soap traces
5. Mix egg yolks and olive oil together
6. Carefully pour approximately 4 ounces of traced soap into egg and oil mix, stirring carefully
7. Add the egg and soap mixture slowly into the rest of the traced soap
8. Pour into prepared molds and cover with plastic wrap
9. Allow to stand covered and out of drafts for 48 hours
10. Remove form molds and cut as desired
11. Allow to age in open air for 2-3 weeks before using

 


 

Ginger Soap

This is a lovely and useful soap. I have a lot of friends who have diabetes who use this to help the circulation for feet and hands

10 ounces Palm Oil
4 ounces Coconut Oil
2 ounces Olive Oil
2 ounces lye
4 fluid ounces water
4 fluid ounces ginger juice and water
1/4 fluid ounce Ginger Essential (optional)

Directions:
1. Take a hand of ginger and run it through a juicer
2. Add the pulp back to the juice and enough water to equal 4 ounces
3. Pour lye into the water (never pour water into lye) - Set aside to cool
4. Melt oils together -set aside to cool
5. When oils are approximately 110 degrees Fahrenheit and lye water is approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit, gently pour lye into oils (never pour oils into lye)
6. Add juice to mixture, stirring constantly
7. Mix until soap traces
8. Add Essential Oil (optional)
9. Pour into prepared molds and cover with plastic wrap
10. Allow to stand covered and out of drafts for 48 hours
11. Remove form molds and cut as desired
12. Allow to age in open air for 2-3 weeks before using

 


 

Honey Soap

Honey soap is a beautiful soap with a wonderful, sweet smell. It comes out a great deep brown color, and feels fabulous on your skin. Here's a tip for you, whenever you are measuring honey or molasses or any other viscous liquid along those lines, if you spray the measuring cup or spoon with a PAM type spray, the honey will pour out more completely, and cleanup will be much easier.

12 oz vegetable shortening
4 oz coconut oil
1 oz beeswax
1 cup distilled water
2 oz lye
1/8 cup (1 fluid ounce) honey

Directions:
1. Pour lye into the water (never pour water into lye) - Set aside to cool
2. Melt vegetable shortening
3. Over a double boiler, melt beeswax and coconut oil together and keep warm
4. When shortening is approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit and lye is approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit, gently pour lye into shortening (never pour oils into lye)
5. Stir until tracing occurs
6. Pour beeswax and oil mixture into soap mixture stirring constantly (the mixture will get VERY thick with the addition of the beeswax mix)
7. When the beeswax mixture is completely blended, stir in the honey
8. Pour into prepared molds and cover with plastic wrap
9. Allow to stand covered and out of drafts for 48 hours
10. Remove from molds and cut as desired
11. Allow to age in open air for 2-3 weeks before using

 


 

Oatmeal Soap

We have all seen the oatmeal soaps in the store that cost a fortune. Here's how to make your own. You can substitute other dried material such as cornmeal or pumice for the oatmeal for varying abrasive effects.

10 ounces Palm Oil
4 ounces Coconut Oil
2 ounces Olive Oil
1/4 cup regular oatmeal, run through the blender
2 ounces lye
8 fluid ounces water
1/4 ounce essential oil (optional)

Directions:
1. Pour lye into the water (never pour water into lye) - Set aside to cool
2. Melt palm and coconut oils together -set aside to cool
3. In a blender or food processor, mix the olive oil and oatmeal
4. When palm and coconut oils are approximately 120 degrees Fahrenheit and lye water is approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit, gently pour lye water into oils (never pour oils into lye)
5. Stir until trace
6. Add the oatmeal mixture, and stir until well mixed
7. Pour into prepared molds and cover with plastic wrap
8. Allow to stand covered and out of drafts for 48 hours
9. Remove from molds and cut as desired
10. Allow to age in open air for 2-3 weeks before using

 


 

Peppermint Patty Soap

This is one of my favorite soaps, and a popular one. It looks like a brownie, and smells like a peppermint patty. I hope you enjoy it! You can also leave out the peppermint oil to make plain cocoa soap, or add Orange Essential Oil to make chocolate/orange, coconut fragrance for chocolate/coco soap.

10 ounces Palm Oil
4 ounces Coconut Oil
2 ounces Olive Oil
(Hold back one ounce olive oil to mix with the cocoa powder)
2 ounces lye
1 cup distilled water
3 tablespoons cocoa powder
1/4 ounce peppermint essential oil

Directions:
1. Pour lye into the water (never pour water into lye) - Set aside to cool
2. Melt oils together -set aside to cool
3. When oils are approximately 110 degrees Fahrenheit and lye water is approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit, gently pour lye into oils (never pour oils into lye)
4. Mix until soap traces
5. Add cocoa mixture and essential oil
6. Pour into prepared molds and cover with plastic wrap
7. Allow to stand covered and out of drafts for 48 hours
8. Remove from molds and cut as desired
9. Allow to age in open air for 2-3 weeks before using

 


 

Simple Liquid Soap

In the old days, people made soap using the lye they had leached from wood ashes. This was a long and arduous process that resulted in a paste-like soap. The reason for the paste consistency was the use of Potassium Hydroxide rather than Sodium Hydroxide. Today, you can purchase either variety. The more Potash (Potassium Hydroxide, or KOH) you use, the softer the soap, if you increase the amount of Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH), your soap will be harder. This recipe is a short cold-process version of the normal liquid soap process. When completed, your soap should come out a nice creamy color.

WARNING! you cannot replace NaOH (Sodium Hydroxide) with KOH in a 1 to 1 swap.
It requires approximate 1.4 times as much KOH as NaOH.

12 ounces Palm Oil
4 ounces Coconut Oil
3.5oz POTASSIUM hydroxide
1 cup distilled water
1/4 ounce essential oil (optional)

Directions:
1. Pour potash (KOH) into the water (never pour water into lye) - Set aside to cool
2. Melt oils together -set aside to cool
3. When oils are approximately 110 degrees Fahrenheit and lye water is approximately 100 degrees Fahrenheit, gently pour lye into oils (never pour oils into lye) [This is a much warmer reaction than the NaOH soap. You will notice this if you using a canning jar and touch it with your hand]
4. Mix until soap traces [It takes a little longer to trace, about 45-50 minutes. The trace happens suddenly]
5. You can leave this soap in the cup to age if you like, since you will be mixing it with water later (maybe)
6. Allow to age in open air for 2-3 weeks before using

7. If you wish, you may now thin it to a usable consistency -

a. Add water a little at a time, and mix well [A blender works well for this]
b. When you have the thickness you like, add desired essential oil [This is another good thing about liquid soap, the essential oils need never come in contact with the lye, so the fragrance stays pure.]
Store it in a bottle or pump jar.

 


 

Quick Hand Wash

This recipe is a popular one, because it is great for those times when you a soap to kill all those nasty little germs that you know are crawling around! You can put it in a squirt bottle and keep in your car, boat, or at your sink so that it is handy to grab on a quick trip to the bathroom.

1 cup Aloe Vera Gel
9 teaspoons Alcohol (Rubbing Alcohol works well)
2 teaspoons Vegatable Glycerin
20 drops Lemon Essential Oil

Directions:
1. Mix all ingredients together and pour into your squirt bottle.
2. Shake vigorously for 1-3 minutes.

 





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